Research

RELAM’s interdisciplinary research delves into a myriad of topics on the social, political, economic and historical challenges faced by Latin America and the Caribbean from the past to present.

The region is characterized by important inequalities and exclusion, and understanding them is at the heart of the work by RELAM members, whether they are issues of regional inequalities, [1] gender or sexual orientation.[2] Our researchers publish on questions of citizenship, democratisation (in particular participatory democracy), clientalism, corruption, and the links between media and subnational politics. Many of our researchers are interested in the recent and historical roots of governance, the developmental projects,[3] the fight against poverty,[4] agriculture and food security,[5] reproductive rights,[6] and resource extractivism.[7] The pressing issue of climate change is problematized through the concept of « natural disasters ».[8]

Several RELAM researchers have turned to the study of how social actors mobilize to confront these challenges, whether through a present-day lens or an historical perspective, such as long-standing anti-imperialism movements,[9] resistance, social economy,[10] labour organisations (international, transnational and national),[11] hemispheric social movements.[12] For instance, the landless movement in Brazil is considered through urban social movements, [13] peasants, [14] and utopian visions.[15] The topic of resource extraction and indigenous movements are studied for Colombia, Chile, and Mexico.[16] And indigenous cosmovision is considered for Mexico and the Andes. [17] Other forms of resistance include popular culture, such as traditional practices surrounding birth and death[18].

Another research domain studied by several RELAM members is that of violence. Members study the question of violence from the angle of institutional forms[19] (democratic and repressive[20]), arts, [21] gender, [22] and labour.[23] The legacies of armed conflict are investigated from legal perspective[24], memory,[25] gender, [26] and the peace building. [27]

Based in Montreal, RELAM researchers are deeply interested in the Latin American migration to North America, in particular Quebec and Canada. Latin American migration is studied comparatively,[28] such as conditions for migrant workers,[29] human rights,[30] or the link between migration and diversity. [31] Moreover, questions of migration are closely connected to urban studies, such as Latin American populations in US cities[32] or the question of urban identities. [33]

As well, RELAM researchers engage the fields of language and literature: from translation,[34] teaching,[35] to linguistics. [36] Some members publish on hispano-american literature, contemporary digital publications[37] or past inquiries into slavery.[38] Theater,[39] performance and poetry[40] are also key to RELAM’s research interests.

With all these topics of past and ongoing research, RELAM is one of the most dynamic networks for the study of Latin American and Caribbean.

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[1] Coomes, O.T., Y. Takasaki and J.M. Rhemtulla. 2016. “Forests as landscapes of social inequality: tropical forest cover and land distribution among shifting cultivators”, Ecology and Society 21(3):2

[2] Carlos Figari, Queer Argie, American Quarterly Volume 66, Number 3, September 2014 pp. 621-63

[3] Hetherington, K. 2016. “Surveying the Future Perfect: Anthropology, Development and the Promise of Infrastructure”, in Infrastructures and Social Complexity: A Routledge Companion. Eds. Penny Harvey, Casper Bruun Jensen & Atsuro Morita. London: Routledge. (Fall 2016).

[4] Nagels, N. 2016. “The Social Investment Perspective, Conditional Cash Transfer Progammes and the Welfare Mix: Peru and Bolivia”, Social Policy and Society, vol. 15, num.3, pp. 479-493.

[5] Hetherington, K., 2013 “Beans Before the Law: Knowledge Practices, Responsibility, and the Paraguayan Soy Boom.” Cultural Anthropology 28:65-85.2013.

[6] Jaffary, Nora, Reproduction and Its Discontents in Mexico: Childbirth and Contraception from 1750 to 1905. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2016.

[7] Daviken Studnicki-Gizbert (2016) Canadian mining in Latin America (1990 to present): a provisional history, Canadian Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Studies / Revue canadienne des études latino-américaines et caraïbes, 41:1, 95-113.

[8] Gould, Kevin A., M. Magdalena Garcia, and Jacob AC Remes. 2016.  “Beyond natural-disasters-are-not-natural”: the work of state and nature after the 2010 earthquake in Chile.” Journal of Political Ecology 23: 94-114.

[9] Dorais, Geneviève, Missionary Critiques of Empire, 1920-1932: Between Interventionism and Anti-imperialism.” International History Review. 39:3 (2017). P. 377-403.

[10] Tello Rozas, S. 2016. Inclusive innovations through social and solidarity economy initiatives: A process analysis of a Peruvian case study. Voluntas : International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organization, 27(1): 61-85, DOI: 10.1007/s11266-015-9606-y.

[11] Dufour-Poirier, M. 2016. « Les identités collectives au fondement de la solidarité syndicale transnationale : analyse de deux syndicats miniers du Pérou », Revue Travail, Capital et Société / Labour, Capital and Society (Canada), vol. 46. Accepté (sous presse). Thomas Collombat, 2014, The international labour movement and the Global Social Protection Floor, Global Social Policy, 14 (1), pp. 432-435.

[12] Marie-Christine Doran (2014) Religion and politics in land takeovers in Mexico: new dimensions of “classical ” social movements?, Canadian Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Studies / Revue canadienne des études latino-américaines et caraïbes, 39:1, 72-92.

[13] Charmain Levy, Anne Latendresse, Marianne Carle-Marsan, Gendering the Urban Social Movement and Public Housing Policy in São Paulo  LATIN AMERICAN PERSPECTIVES, Issue 214, Vol. 44 No. 3, May 2017, 9–27.

[14] Catherine LeGrand, Colonización y Protesta Campesina en Colombia (1850-1950) (Bogotá: Universidad Nacional, 1988). Re-published by Ediciones Uniandes, with a prologue by Francisco Gutiérrez, Bogotá, 2016

[15] Ricardo Peñafiel « Espaces utopique, L’eutopie concrète de l’action transgressive », revue Tumultes (revue du Centre de Sociologie des Pratiques et des Représentations Politiques de l’université Paris Diderot-Paris 7), 2016/2 n° 47, 27-42.

[16] Celis L. (2016). Pueblos y territorios indígenas frente al extractivismo: la sobrevivencia de pueblos indígenas en peligro de extinción. Revista Pléyade e-ISSN 0719-3696. (18). Martig, Alexis, 2014, La reconnaissance sociale et le Mouvement des Sans Terre du Brésil, Paris, l’Harmattan. Cuadra Montoya, X (2016). La revendication autochtone contre le projet hydro-électrique Neltume au Chili: Un regard décolonial sur les antagonismes sociaux. Cahiers du CIERA de l’Université du Laval, 13, 60-78.

[17] Pierre Beaucage, 2009, Corps, cosmos et environnement chez les Nahuas de la Sierra Norte de Puebla : une aventure en anthropologieSociedad Agropecuaria del CEPEC. Taller de Tradición Oral., lux editeur.

Eduardo Kohn, 2013, How Forests Think Toward an Anthropology Beyond the Human, University of California Press. Hall, Ingrid, 2016 « Parole et hiérarchie dans les Andes du Sud du Pérou ». Autrepart, nᵒ 73 (29 juillet 2016): 89‑103.

[18] Norget, Kristin, 2006,   Days of Death, Days of Life: Ritual in the Popular Culture of Oaxaca. (NY: Columbia University Press).

[19] Hilgers, Tina, and Laura Macdonald (eds). Forthcoming 2017. Violence in Latin America and the Caribbean: Subnational Structures, Institutions, and Clientelistic Networks. New York: Cambridge University Press.

[20] Leila Celis, and William Avilés. (2017). Introduction: Democracy, Repression and the Defense of Human Rights. Latin American Perspectives.

[21] Carton de Grammont, Nuria. « Francis Alÿs et la géographie de la violence ». In Archée, Octobre 2012. archee.qc.ca/ar.php

[22] Patricia M. Martin & Nohora Carvajal (2016) Feminicide as ‘act’ and ‘process ’: a geography of gendered violence in Oaxaca, Gender, Place & Culture, 23:7, 989-1002.

[23] Jean François Mayer. (2017). Violência e Trabalho: o caso das empregadas domésticas no Brasil. In Tina Hilgers and Jorge Luiz Barbosa. (Eds.) A violência na América Latina e no Caribe – vista dos profissionais da luta em contra da violência. Observatorio das favelas, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. : 123-147.

[24] Jean François Mayer. (2017). Violência e Trabalho: o caso das empregadas domésticas no Brasil. In Tina Hilgers and Jorge Luiz Barbosa. (Eds.) A violência na América Latina e no Caribe – vista dos profissionais da luta em contra da violência. Observatorio das favelas, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. : 123-147.

[25] Cynthia E. Milton, Conflicted Memory: Military Cultural Interventions in Human Rights Era Peru, Madison: University of Wisconsin Press (in production, expected December 2017).

[26] Grimard, F. and S. Laszlo. 2014. “Long term effects of civil conflict on women’s health outcomes in Peru.” World Development Vol. 54: 139-155.

[27] Nathalie Gravel & Nicolas Foucras Tournaud (2015) Vers une paix durable au Mexique, Canadian Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Studies / Revue canadienne des études latino-américaines et caraïbes 40:2, 154-156.

[28] Armony, Victor (dir.) (2014) : New Horizons: Latin American Immigrants in Canada, Israel, and Spain, numéro spécial de Canadian Ethnic Studies (Association canadienne d’études ethniques), vol. 46, nº 3.

[29] Jorge Pantaleón, Mise en valeur, conversions et reconversions monetaires: les cycles des travailleurs agricoles saisonniers étrangers au Quebec, Altérités, vol. 8 , no 1, 2011 : 89 – 101.

[30] Duhaime, B., et C.Campbell-Duruflé (dir.), “Defending the Human Rights of Migrants in the Americas : The Nadège Dorzema et al v Dominican Republic Case”, (2013) Hors Série de la Revue Québécoise de Droit International

[31] Armony, V. 2015. « Diverging Policy Approaches to Diversity in a Bi-National Country: The Case of Canada », Fédéralisme – Régionalisme (Université de Liège), vol. 15.

[32] JOLIVET V. (2015) Miami la cubaine. Géographie d’une ville-carrefour entre les Amériques, Presses Universitaires de Rennes, coll. Géographie sociale, (272 p.)

[33] JOLIVET V. (2015) Miami la cubaine. Géographie d’une ville-carrefour entre les Amériques, Presses Universitaires de Rennes, coll. Géographie sociale, (272 p.)

[34] Bastin Georges L. H. Buzelin, M.A. Belle, A. Echeverri, C. Gagnon et S. Vandaele) (dirs) (2015). Les horizons de la traduction : retour vers le futur, META vol. 60, nº 2

[35] Uribe, C., Cedergren, H. et Payeras, J. (2014). Les effets de l’enseignement des phénomènes d’enchaînement sur la production orale des élèves dans un cours d’espagnol langue étrangère au Québec. The Canadian Modern Language Review / La revue canadienne des langues vivantes 70(4), p. 559-587.

[36] 2013 – Jessica Coon. Aspects of Split Ergativity. New York: Oxford University Press

[37] Ferrer, C. (2014). El canon literario hispanoamericano en la era digital. Humanidades Digitales: desafíos, logros y perspectivas de futuro, 185–195.

[38] José Jouve-Martin Esclavos de la ciudad letrada: esclavitud, escritura y colonialismo en Lima (1650-1700). Lima: Instituto de Estudios Peruanos, 2005. 206 pp.

[39]Katherine Zien, “A Future in the Present: The Theatre of Raúl Leis,” Contemporary Theatre Review, 2013.

[40]Roberto Viereck, La Voz Letrada: de la Escritura a la Oralidad (Seis Entrevistas a Poetas Indígenas Latinoamericanos). Quito: Abya Yala, 2012.